Archive for March, 2011

food and culture project for green media

March 25th, 2011
food and culture project for green media

1. select, research, and cook a dish that means something to your family, culture, and/or heritage.

2. enlist a family member to help you cook - or help you learn how to cook - your dish. your family member can be anyone - a mother, a father, a grandparent, a great grandparent, a cousin, an aunt, an uncle, a brother, a sister, or anyone else related to you. although the family member does not need to live near you, s/he does need to be accessible via communication (phone, Skype, email, letters, carrier pigeons). ideally, the family member you select should be someone you enjoy learning from and spending time with.

3. using words and photography, document your cooking process in the form of a blog post, flickr set, or video. be sure to include a recipe. you may use up to 20 photos - no more. if you are making a video it must be under 2 minutes long.

4. at least one of your photographs must be of your family member or of the communication between you and your family member.

5. your goal with this project is to tell two stories - one about the relationship between food and culture and one about the relationship between you and your family member. this part will not be easy. be creative.

6. once finished and certainly by class on tuesday, april 5, tweet your food and culture project. Be sure to include a link and #greenmedia somewhere within your tweet.

7. bring your dish to class on tuesday, april 5. bring serving utensils, a plate, a bowl, a fork, a spoon, and your appetite.

paper 4 for golden gate park first-year seminar

March 24th, 2011
Paper 4 for Golden Gate Park

1. Select any topic related to a) Golden Gate Park and b) your major (or prospective major) and write a paper about it. Be sure to select a topic that truly interests you.

2. Find and use at least three outside readings. As discussed in class, your readings must be from credible and legitimate sources.

3. At some point in your paper, you must introduce a naysayer. For this part, I highly encourage you to re-read Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein's chapter, "'Skeptics May Object': Planting a Naysayer in Your Text," in They Say / I Say.

4. Also at some point in your paper, you must answer two questions: "Who cares?" and "So what?" For this part, I encourage you to re-read Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein's chapter, "'So What? Who Cares?': Saying Why It Matters," in They Say / I Say.

5. As decided collectively in class, your paper is to be between 3-5 pages - no more, no less.

6. Edit carefully. If I find three or more errors - spelling, grammar, typos - I will stop reading your paper, return it to you, and ask you to re-edit and re-submit.

7. Sometime between now and class on Tuesday, April 5, tweet the topic of your paper. Be sure to include the #rhet195 hashtag in your tweet.

8. Paper 4 is due in class on Tuesday, April 5. No late work accepted.

paper 4 for golden gate park first-year seminar

March 24th, 2011
Paper 4 for Golden Gate Park

1. Select any topic related to a) Golden Gate Park and b) your major (or prospective major) and write a paper about it. Be sure to select a topic that truly interests you.

2. Find and use at least three outside readings. As discussed in class, your readings must be from credible and legitimate sources.

3. At some point in your paper, you must introduce a naysayer. For this part, I highly encourage you to re-read Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein's chapter, "'Skeptics May Object': Planting a Naysayer in Your Text," in They Say / I Say.

4. Also at some point in your paper, you must answer two questions: "Who cares?" and "So what?" For this part, I encourage you to re-read Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein's chapter, "'So What? Who Cares?': Saying Why It Matters," in They Say / I Say.

5. As decided collectively in class, your paper is to be between 3-5 pages - no more, no less.

6. Edit carefully. If I find three or more errors - spelling, grammar, typos - I will stop reading your paper, return it to you, and ask you to re-edit and re-submit.

7. Sometime between now and class on Tuesday, April 5, tweet the topic of your paper. Be sure to include the #rhet195 hashtag in your tweet.

8. Paper 4 is due in class on Tuesday, April 5. No late work accepted.

paper 4 for golden gate park first-year seminar

March 24th, 2011
Paper 4 for Golden Gate Park

1. Select any topic related to a) Golden Gate Park and b) your major (or prospective major) and write a paper about it. Be sure to select a topic that truly interests you.

2. Find and use at least three outside readings. As discussed in class, your readings must be from credible and legitimate sources.

3. At some point in your paper, you must introduce a naysayer. For this part, I highly encourage you to re-read Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein's chapter, "'Skeptics May Object': Planting a Naysayer in Your Text," in They Say / I Say.

4. Also at some point in your paper, you must answer two questions: "Who cares?" and "So what?" For this part, I encourage you to re-read Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein's chapter, "'So What? Who Cares?': Saying Why It Matters," in They Say / I Say.

5. As decided collectively in class, your paper is to be between 3-5 pages - no more, no less.

6. Edit carefully. If I find three or more errors - spelling, grammar, typos - I will stop reading your paper, return it to you, and ask you to re-edit and re-submit.

7. Sometime between now and class on Tuesday, April 5, tweet the topic of your paper. Be sure to include the #rhet195 hashtag in your tweet.

8. Paper 4 is due in class on Tuesday, April 5. No late work accepted.

paper 4 for golden gate park first-year seminar

March 24th, 2011
Paper 4 for Golden Gate Park

1. Select any topic related to a) Golden Gate Park and b) your major (or prospective major) and write a paper about it. Be sure to select a topic that truly interests you.

2. Find and use at least three outside readings. As discussed in class, your readings must be from credible and legitimate sources.

3. At some point in your paper, you must introduce a naysayer. For this part, I highly encourage you to re-read Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein's chapter, "'Skeptics May Object': Planting a Naysayer in Your Text," in They Say / I Say.

4. Also at some point in your paper, you must answer two questions: "Who cares?" and "So what?" For this part, I encourage you to re-read Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein's chapter, "'So What? Who Cares?': Saying Why It Matters," in They Say / I Say.

5. As decided collectively in class, your paper is to be between 3-5 pages - no more, no less.

6. Edit carefully. If I find three or more errors - spelling, grammar, typos - I will stop reading your paper, return it to you, and ask you to re-edit and re-submit.

7. Sometime between now and class on Tuesday, April 5, tweet the topic of your paper. Be sure to include the #rhet195 hashtag in your tweet.

8. Paper 4 is due in class on Tuesday, April 5. No late work accepted.