Archive for March, 2017

2017 Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-A-Thon follow-up!

March 31st, 2017
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Participants in this year’s Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-A-Thon at Gleeson Library

Earlier this month, Gleeson Library partnered with the Art+Architecture department and Professor Paula Birnbaum’s Museum Studies class to participate in the Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-A-Thon.  At this year’s event — the third annual one we’ve held at Gleeson — we talked about the gender gap on Wikipedia, we searched for information about women artists in various library resources (like this one), and we incrementally added to, edited, and/or fixed formatting in several Wikipedia articles (Lorna Dee Cervantes, Jennifer Angus, and Anita Magsaysay-Ho to name just a few).  USF editors were in good company: other local and international libraries, museums, and organizations participated in the Art+Feminism Edit-A-Thon which ran throughout this year’s Women’s History Month, with many satellite events falling on or near International Women’s Day. As we head into April, Women’s History Month is coming to a close, but efforts to improve representation on Wikipedia will hopefully continue far beyond this designated month, and necessarily so. As one Edit-A-Thon participant was overheard commenting: “I could definitely see myself editing Wikipedia in my spare time.” Reflecting upon the Edit-A-Thon, another participant wrote that the lack of representation of women and their accomplishments on a widely used site like Wikipedia affects “women across all spheres.” “Being a part of this day allowed my peers and I to actively fight for the future of our careers.” To these two participants, and all of the new and continuing editors who helped improve Wikipedia at this year’s Edit-A-Thon — many thanks!


Infertility Exhibit

March 27th, 2017

Our newest Student Social Justice Exhibit in the library is on the topic of infertility.  Many thanks to Otto, Zoe, and Milton for creating this informative exhibit!

Many women, across the globe, are unable to explain their entire biological body.  Thus, female biology is an applied pedagogy that ascribes almost half of all the people who live on this planet and affects individual women differently.  Here, we consider infertility as a health topic, the impacts of modern medicine, and the consequence of or for social justice.  This library display aims to cover the facts about infertility and the stigma behind this health care concern as a social justice issue.

Otto, Zoe, and Milton

Gleeson Library cordially invites USF students to create library displays on social justice issues near and dear to you. You come up with the idea and design your own signage. The library will supply the space and the books. Sound intriguing? We’d love to hear from you. Please email reference@usfca.edu to collaborate on a student social justice exhibit.

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Happy Open Education Week!

March 27th, 2017

Happy Open Education Week!

Open Education Week is an international celebration of the hard work and success stories behind the idea of “free and open sharing in education.” For many students, this is a no-brainer: Textbooks are expensive!

So expensive, in fact, that many students don’t buy them, which has a real impact on classroom learning. Initially, the open education movement began with a desire to address the prohibitive cost of textbooks by using the power of the Internet. But as the movement has spread, many professors and students have found that having control over the material means better customizability, multimedia opportunities, and flipped classroom teaching. It’s been a win-win for everyone!

Here at the University of San Francisco, our librarians consult with faculty in order to flip their courses to the open education resources (OER) model by using library databases and vetted materials that are free online. We’ll be tabling at the Ed Tech Expo on Tuesday, March 28th from 9am to 2pm at the McLaren Center to talk about OERs and answer any questions.

If you can’t make it to the Expo, no problem! Students, faculty, and staff can contact Charlotte Roh at croh2(at)usfca.edu to talk further.


Ruth Warncke, American Library Association Leader

March 23rd, 2017

Ruth Warncke (1910-1998) was a national leader in adult education and served as Deputy Director of the American Library Association from 1965 to 1972.  Her colleagues described her as “a professional feminist long before it was popular”.  When the next supplement to the Dictionary of American Library Biography comes out she will undoubtedly be included. My decision to write about Warncke during Women’s History Month was prompted by a postcard (see above) I recently acquired for my collection of librariana. The postcard was mailed to Warncke in 1971.  Warncke began her career as a teacher and school librarian in Glenview, IL and later held positions in public libraries in New York and Michigan. She was hired by ALA in 1955 to lead the American Heritage Project funded by the Ford Foundation to assist public libraries in discussions of American heritage.  In 1956 she became director of another ALA national level project, the Library Community Project, which was designed to strengthen adult education activities and services in public libraries in the United States. In 1960 she left ALA and served on the faculty of Case Western University Library School until 1965 when she became Deputy Director of ALA.  I’m always delighted to obtain a postcard that has a personal link to a librarian. This postcard was mailed by a friend of Warncke who was traveling in the Southwest U.S.. The picture side of the postcard is a spectacular view of Zion National Park in Utah. I got the postcard at a stamp show from a dealer who was aware of my interest in library related postal items. 

Ruth Warncke, American Library Association Leader

March 23rd, 2017

Ruth Warncke (1910-1998) was a national leader in adult education and served as Deputy Director of the American Library Association from 1965 to 1972.  Her colleagues described her as “a professional feminist long before it was popular”.  When the next supplement to the Dictionary of American Library Biography comes out she will undoubtedly be included. My decision to write about Warncke during Women’s History Month was prompted by a postcard (see above) I recently acquired for my collection of librariana. The postcard was mailed to Warncke in 1971.  Warncke began her career as a teacher and school librarian in Glenview, IL and later held positions in public libraries in New York and Michigan. She was hired by ALA in 1955 to lead the American Heritage Project funded by the Ford Foundation to assist public libraries in discussions of American heritage.  In 1956 she became director of another ALA national level project, the Library Community Project, which was designed to strengthen adult education activities and services in public libraries in the United States. In 1960 she left ALA and served on the faculty of Case Western University Library School until 1965 when she became Deputy Director of ALA.  I’m always delighted to obtain a postcard that has a personal link to a librarian. This postcard was mailed by a friend of Warncke who was traveling in the Southwest U.S.. The picture side of the postcard is a spectacular view of Zion National Park in Utah. I got the postcard at a stamp show from a dealer who was aware of my interest in library related postal items. 
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